Corpus Christi! Amen

Corpus Christi!  Amen

Eating has deep traditional implications in our faith tradition.  In the Jewish custom, acceptance of somebody into the intimacy of a meal means acceptance of the person into friendship and solidarity. A meal is a celebration of the covenants that bind people together.  Every time people say a blessing before a meal, lift a glass and say fine things to one another, they mutually nourish their respective lives.  A meal is a ritual of re-affirmation of shared faiths and beliefs.

The Eucharist is a meal.  It is a meal we celebrate in fulfillment of Christ’s command “Do this in memory of me…” The Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ is a special celebration of this special meal where the gifts of bread and wine, fruits of the earth and work of human hands, are transformed or shall we say “transubstantiated” into the Body and Blood of Christ.  In a real and sacramental way, the Eucharist is the celebration of the death of Christ on the Cross.  It is a celebration of His great love for us.  In this sense, the Eucharist is referred to as the Sacrifice of the Mass.

To partake in the Eucharist is to invite Christ to transform our lives.  It is to invite Christ to transform our lives into a life of self-sacrifice in imitation of His own sacrifice on the Cross.  It is to invite ourselves to become like Christ in our persons, words and works.  It is to resolve to follow the example of Christ in loving and serving others. As we answer “Amen” to the words “The Body of Christ”, we accept in faith our communion with Christ and with all of our fellow human beings who have become God’s children through the power of His death and resurrection.

In the words of the Second Vatican Council Fathers, the Eucharist is the center of our Christian life, the principle from which all our activities flow.

The Eucharist is a celebration of God’s covenant with us.  It is the covenant meal that binds us together as sons and daughters of God.  The Eucharist is our social response to the call for oneness.  Coming to this celebration is a responsibility to our community as Church, as God’s people.